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  • Ed Beeson

    Member
    February 24, 2021 at 3:14 am

    James,

    That creates a bit of a dilema. What does your IA think? A whole in that casting is quite different from a crack in a formed frame the AD has you look for. I am not so sure it is really a big deal in regards to strength or integrity but I’m not a structural engineer. You can probably pay for an opinion from Textron. I think I might lean toward finding a structural engineer to evaluate if I was going to make it an issue.

    Ed B.

  • Ed Beeson

    Member
    February 22, 2021 at 4:32 am

    Ed,

    I get where you are coming from and it makes sense. If you really want the regulatory document though I’d check the STC paperwork that was used to alter your plane. It should have included what would be necessary. For example when I converted a 170B with a TCM IO-360 the instructions I used for the conversion listed the specific instruments and their limits. Since it is specifically listed in the “approved” STC paperwork it is regulatory.

    One possible big difference between the conversion and one of the other planes you list is the type of injection. Did the Peterson STC convert the fuel system and use a TCM injection system or does it use an RSA system?

    Ed B.

  • Ed Beeson

    Member
    February 18, 2021 at 5:54 pm

    A guess would be oil from an excessive amount of grease on the jack screw weeped into a limit switch creating a high resistance situation.

    Ed B.

  • Ed Beeson

    Member
    February 18, 2021 at 3:55 am

    I’ve done a few and what I have found is no two are exactly alike. The second one will go far easier and quicker than the first. Every hole might use a little bit different means and tool. It is good to hear there is a PMA’d/AMOC on the kit now.

    Ed B.

  • Ed Beeson

    Member
    January 9, 2021 at 4:51 am

    Eric,

    Have you capacity checked that battery again? I doubt you saved it to a point it passes the 85% capacity point. I’ll grant a battery doesn’t need to retain anywhere close to capacity in order to work normal use and starting if kept charged. The capacity test takes a fully charged battery and insures the amount of charge it stores meets a minimum quantity. How many times in real use will that happen?

    The draw back and what you need to keep in mind is if you ever lose you charging capability and flying around on nothing but a battery for power, that battery may or may not be capable of supplying the 13 t0 15 amps for an acceptable amount of time before voltage drops off and it will no longer keep things powered.

    For your type of aircraft and operation it is your decision and I don’t want this to come across as I’m in any way second guessing that. I just would not expect that battery to come anywhere close to meeting minimum standards set by the mfg. I take care of quite a few turbine powered aircraft and as such the mfg. recommendations do become more mandatory. I replace a good number of batteries that like the one you have are quite capable of completing a start and recharging but if they ever lose the charging capability they just won’t last very long under a continuous load.

    Ed B.

  • Ed Beeson

    Member
    January 2, 2021 at 5:36 am

    Lawson,

    I’d take a look at the throttle control arm. Can you move it one serration to change the arc. You will need to insure that the control can still move the throttle valve stop to stop without the control itself becoming the stop. What you are attempting to do is keep arm at the full power position from arcing back up and reactivating the switch. It would likely mean the arc up at the full idle position would be higher and switch adjustment would need completed again. It may sound simple but could wind up being one minor tweak leads to numerous minor adjustments that in the end put you right back to where you started and the only solution is to realign the switch a little different. As this is an STC conversion, it is possible something is just a tiny bit different leading to the need to make a minor tweak to the bracket or mounting itself. Be careful not to create a bigger problem while attempting to fix this one.

    Ed B.

  • Ed Beeson

    Member
    December 23, 2020 at 7:03 am

    [quote quote=216602]“I think ” means I don’t know!

    [/quote]
    I suppose you can look at it that way. I find making an absolute statemant like that tends to encourage someone to prove you wrong.

    Ed B.

  • Ed Beeson

    Member
    December 22, 2020 at 6:30 am

    I assumed the referenced radio was not a GPS as it was noted as a nav/com. I stand corrected if there is a GPS involved it does become a major alteration. An IFR unit   suggests it is perhaps a WAAS unit. Is it also utilized as part of the ADSb solution? Is it coupled to an autopilot? What type of indicator was used? Is there an interconnect for a DME, encoder inputs? Obtaining the required paperwork for some of the more complicated installations from Garmin gets sticky and difficult.

    Obviously, I am not familiar with the unit in question so I’ll just leave it and report I don’t have any previous 337 for an installation of the 300XL. I have put in a couple of the PS Engineering audio panels as part of package changes in the last couple years and don’t recall including that in any of the 337’s.

    Sorry about any confusion created.

    Ed B.

     

  • Ed Beeson

    Member
    December 21, 2020 at 9:09 am

    Robert,

    I don’t think you really need a 337 for a TSO’d nav/com or audio panel installation. I’d consider it a minor alteration especially if you are replacing a previously installed one. That said it will need some maintenance entries completed by an appropriately rated individual or entity.

    Ed B.

  • Ed Beeson

    Member
    December 17, 2020 at 4:48 am

    My opinion,

    I would assume the engine isn’t actually quitting but the Surefly is advanced far enough the magneto isn’t really doing much to effect the ops. Now turn the  Surefly off and the spark suddenly retards perhaps 15 degrees. My bet is it will create the feel and sense the engine is quitting. I’d bet it isn’t as notable on an engine that requires the timing the same as that of the mechanical magneto and not set up to use advanced timing based on MAP.

    I’ve only installed one myself so as noted this is purely a guess by me.

    Ed B.

  • Ed Beeson

    Member
    December 12, 2020 at 4:58 am

    Tom,

    I attempted to add a couple of links to FAR 43. These are the rules I am bound by as an IA when I conduct an annual or 100 hr. inspection. You will see in the appendix the reference to wheels and bearings does not include cleaning and lubing but does reference inspection for condition.

    The other tag to additional performance rules points out I will use a checklist to conduct the inspection. If my checklist tells me I will clean and lube the bearings is it required?

    I’m speaking for myself as ask 5 IA’s and you are apt to get 5 differing opinions. For convenience I’ll attempt to find a checklist that came from the manufacturer. These will normally be marked as meeting the requirements of  Appendix D of part 43. If it isn’t noted that doesn’t really eliminate it but it does put the burden of insuring it does on me as the IA when completing an annual. Perhaps that checklist tells me to clean and lube wheel bearings, how can I say it isn’t required? I can argue appendix D does not say to lube. In my endorsement for “airworthy” I modify the sign off from that in the FAR to include the type of checklist used. Or in other words I will note the inspection was completed per FAR 43 appendix D.  If I want to reference the specific checklist I used in the endorsement I will need to insure I have completed everything included on that checklist. That can get very involved and put an unnecessary financial burden on an owner as it normally will include far more than is necessary for appendix D compliance. This is why you will find repair stations that will tell you it is mandatory as their operating rules may lock them into completing the inspection per manufacturers recommendations. They do not really have the ability to use judgement on the necessity of the task as it is included on their checklist.

    Probably more info than necessary to answer the question.

    Ed B.
    <h2>§43.15   Additional performance rules for inspections.</h2>
    (a) General. Each person performing an inspection required by part 91, 125, or 135 of this chapter, shall—

    (1) Perform the inspection so as to determine whether the aircraft, or portion(s) thereof under inspection, meets all applicable airworthiness requirements; and

    (2) If the inspection is one provided for in part 125, 135, or §91.409(e) of this chapter, perform the inspection in accordance with the instructions and procedures set forth in the inspection program for the aircraft being inspected.

    (c) Annual and 100-hour inspections. (1) Each person performing an annual or 100-hour inspection shall use a checklist while performing the inspection. The checklist may be of the person’s own design, one provided by the manufacturer of the equipment being inspected or one obtained from another source. This checklist must include the scope and detail of the items contained in appendix D to this part and paragraph (b) of this section.

    (2) Each person approving a reciprocating-engine-powered aircraft for return to service after an annual or 100-hour inspection shall, before that approval, run the aircraft engine or engines to determine satisfactory performance in accordance with the manufacturer’s recommendations of—

    (i) Power output (static and idle r.p.m.);

    (ii) Magnetos;

    (iii) Fuel and oil pressure; and

    (iv) Cylinder and oil temperature.

    (3) Each person approving a turbine-engine-powered aircraft for return to service after an annual, 100-hour, or progressive inspection shall, before that approval, run the aircraft engine or engines to determine satisfactory performance in accordance with the manufacturer’s recommendations.

    <h2 class=”apphead”>Appendix D to Part 43—Scope and Detail of Items (as Applicable to the Particular Aircraft) To Be Included in Annual and 100-Hour Inspections</h2>
    (a) Each person performing an annual or 100-hour inspection shall, before that inspection, remove or open all necessary inspection plates, access doors, fairing, and cowling. He shall thoroughly clean the aircraft and aircraft engine.

    (e) Each person performing an annual or 100-hour inspection shall inspect (where applicable) the following components of the landing gear group:

    (1) All units—for poor condition and insecurity of attachment.

    (2) Shock absorbing devices—for improper oleo fluid level.

    (3) Linkages, trusses, and members—for undue or excessive wear fatigue, and distortion.

    (4) Retracting and locking mechanism—for improper operation.

    (5) Hydraulic lines—for leakage.

    (6) Electrical system—for chafing and improper operation of switches.

    (7) Wheels—for cracks, defects, and condition of bearings.

    (8) Tires—for wear and cuts.

    (9) Brakes—for improper adjustment.

    (10) Floats and skis—for insecure attachment and obvious or apparent defects.

    I couldn’t get the links to come up so I cut and pasted the portions that contain the wording I referenced.  If anyone needs to confirm these are references found in FAR 43 and appendix D.

    Ed B.

  • Ed Beeson

    Member
    December 10, 2020 at 6:25 pm

    That is what the owner decided to do. It is hard after being quoted 135.00 based on history for a power supply to now suddenly jumping up over 1100 dollars.

    Ed B.

  • Ed Beeson

    Member
    December 9, 2020 at 6:21 pm

    I believe it is Mistras Services  I checked with not long ago and they confirmed they could complete the checks. There’s also one out of Portland that I’ve used in the past for eddy current checks.

    Ed B.

  • Ed Beeson

    Member
    December 9, 2020 at 6:15 pm

    That is the anti-retraction safety. It is activated  by the the extension of the nose gear and squat switch as noted. You likely have a switch or wiring problem.

    Ed B.

  • Ed Beeson

    Member
    December 3, 2020 at 2:39 pm

    Scott,

    If practicing an emergency extension you will need to pull the c/b. Otherwise anytime you change the direction of the gear handle the pressure in the system will drop leading to the pressure switch turning the pump on and overriding any hand pump operation. In an actual emergency situation it won’t be necessary to disable the pump.

    Something not mentioned regarding the warning system involves the flap settings. When the flaps are deployed beyond 18 to 20 degrees with the gear retracted the horn should sound.

    Ed B.

Viewing 1 - 15 of 317 posts